Healthier Foods | Recipes | Vegetarian

Kumquat Poppy Seed Vinaigrette Dressing

Vinaigrette dressing, just bursting with color and a tart-sweet flavor from kumquats and poppy seeds. It’s perfect drizzled over veggies, grains, fish, or chicken. And of course, on salads!

Give a cheer, Spring is here!  Although there’s still quite a bit of unmelted snow in Appleton, Wisconsin, the date on the calendar tells us that the season of Spring has sprung, and I’m overjoyed about it!  I look forward to daffodils popping through the soil, warm air blowing in through the screen door, and rain falling from the skies, because all of that means that seasonal spring veggies are right around the corner!

My friend Tara over at Noshing with the Nolands had to be away from her blog this week, so she asked me if I’d help her out with a recipe post.  Of course I said yes, because there’s not a whole lot more I love than to help a friend in need. Besides, I love vinaigrette dressing and so does Tara!

This kumquat poppy seed vinaigrette dressing has fresh kumquats for a tart-sweet flavor and a burst of color. It's perfect drizzled over salads, vegetables, grains, poultry, or even fish. Get the recipe from @itsyummi

Check out my recipe for Kumquat Poppy Seed Vinaigrette Dressing on Tara’s site and you can also see some information that I shared with her readers about creating emulsions! While you’re there, take a peek at a few of Tara’s recipes and her amazing food photography.  I think you’ll understand why I adore Tara and her blog so much.

FOOD FACTS – Kumquats

  • Kumquats are a citrus fruit. They’re very tart on the inside, with an edible, sweet rind.  Almost like a miniature, inside-out orange.
  • High in vitamin C
  • The word “kumquat” literally means β€œgolden orange” in Chinese, which is why it’s so popular during Chinese New Year!
  • The Nagami, or Oval Kumquat (Fortunella.margarita) is the most common variety in the United States. It was introduced into Florida from Japan in 1885 and has been grown commercially in the “Kumquat Capitol,” Saint Joseph, Florida since 1895. (data source)
  • Nutritionally, a single kumquat, eaten raw and with the skin, has just 13 calories, no fat, cholesterol or protein, 2 net grams of carbohydrates, and 2 mg of sodium.  I’m not a licensed nutritionist, but I’d say that a suitable serving size would be about 3 kumquats.

This kumquat poppy seed vinaigrette dressing from ItsYummi.com is bursting with color and a tart-sweet flavor! It's perfect on salad, or over veggies, grains, fish, or chicken.

Another tasty vinaigrette dressing that I think you’d like is my raspberry vanilla vinaigrette. Click the photo below to get the recipe!

Raspberry Vanilla Vinaigrette Dressing Recipe - fresh, tangy, and fruity!

 

Can you freeze vinaigrette dressing?

Vinaigrette is a dressing made with oil and vinegar, two ingredients that do not blend together naturally. They are “forced” together in a process called emulsification. Because of this, the dressing will not freeze in its combined state.

However, if you store it in the refrigerator, the poppy seed dressing should keep well for 2-3 weeks.

This kumquat poppy seed vinaigrette dressing has fresh kumquats for a tart-sweet flavor and a burst of color. It's perfect drizzled over salads, vegetables, grains, poultry, or even fish.

Kumquat Poppy Seed Vinaigrette Dressing

This vinaigrette dressing has a sweet-tart taste from fresh kumquats and raw honey, and a pretty color from the poppy seeds. It's perfect for serving over spring vegetables!
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Prep Time 5 mins
Total Time 5 mins
Servings 2 cups
Calories 629 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 15 whole kumquats scrubbed well and rinsed with cold tap water
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon raw honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea or kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 Tablespoon poppy seeds

Instructions
 

  • Place kumquats, vinegar, honey, salt, and pepper into a blender or food processor. Cover with lid and process on medium speed for about 45 seconds, or until kumquats are pulverized and the mixture is a pale orange color.
  • Reduce the speed to low and use the small opening in the top of the lid to slowly drizzle the olive oil into the mixture. Once the olive oil has been incorporated, allow it to blend for another 30 seconds or so. This will help the mixture to emulsify and incorporate air.
  • Turn off the blender or processor, remove the blade, and use a spatula to stir in the poppy seeds. Taste and adjust the seasonings if necessary.
  • Pour the vinaigrette into a covered container with an airtight lid. Store in the refrigerator. If kept chilled, the vinaigrette dressing will stay fresh for up to a month. You may need to shake it up a bit or even blend quickly for 30 seconds if the mixture has separated.

Nutrition

Calories: 629kcalCarbohydrates: 32gProtein: 3gFat: 56gSaturated Fat: 8gSodium: 495mgFiber: 10gSugar: 22g
Tried this recipe? Mention @itsyummi or tag #itsyummirecipe!

Leave a comment below. I’d love to hear from you!

This kumquat poppyseed vinaigrette from ItsYummi.com is bursting with color and a tart-sweet flavor! It's perfect over veggies, grains, fish, or chicken.

Oh, and I also used this vinaigrette dressing to make a delicious Sweet ‘n tangy egg salad. Check out the recipe by clicking the photo below!

Sweet and Tangy Egg Salad Sandwich - recipe from ItsYummi.com

 

This kumquat poppy seed vinaigrette dressing has fresh kumquats for a tart-sweet flavor and a burst of color. It's perfect drizzled over salads, vegetables, grains, poultry, or even fish.

This kumquat poppy seed vinaigrette dressing has fresh kumquats for a tart-sweet flavor and a burst of color. It's perfect drizzled over salads, vegetables, grains, poultry, or even fish.

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19 Comments

  1. I was blessed growing up with a neighbor who had a kumquat tree in her yard and was very generous about sharing its bounty. My girls adore them too! Now I need to see if I can find them in a local market to make this gorgeous golden vinaigrette.

    1. I love hearing happy food stories, Stacy! I can’t understand why kumquats aren’t stocked regularly along with other citrus fruits. They’re so cute and delicious!

  2. You had me at poppy seed, at just the time I’ve started to think about dinner. (Who am I fooling? Those thoughts began about 3 minutes after lunch ended).

    Thing is, I’ve never had a kumquat. Or is it kumquats? Either way, 42 years, and none of it. I don’t even know where to look. this recipe, though … just might get me started.

    1. Ahhh, hunger. The never ending story! πŸ™‚

      Kumquats (yes, with an “s”) are adorable little citrus fruits that are in season from January through the beginning of April. Up where I live, in the Frozen Tundra (aka, Wisconsin), I usually find them at Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, and in Asian grocery stores.

      I hope that you’re able to scavenge some and enjoy this dressing!

  3. I just want to brag that I grow my own Nagami Kumquats β€” on a tree that I grafted (all by myself). LOL. But seriously, Kumquats are commonly considered to be Citrus, but they are actually Fortunella β€” which is a relative of Citrus. The really cool thing about Fortunella is that they go quasi-dormant (unlike Citrus, which are evergreen). Why is this important? Well, it means folks like you β€” in Wisconsin β€” can grow them … outside! They tolerate temperatures into the single digits (for a few hours, anyway). And the trees are small, so you can leave them in a nice container and move them into the house or garage when you feel it necessary.

    This dressing, by the way, looks marvelous! πŸ™‚

  4. So funny, I just wrote up my own Poppy Seed Dressing to post in April. I love that there are so many different variations, I always look forward to trying a new one.

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